Category Archives: Singapore

Whirlwind recap of Google News Lab Summit APAC 2017

All the tools Google wants journalists to know about

By Elaine Ramirez and Brolley Genster
/ Photos by Mike Raomanachai

Google’s News Lab Summit APAC 2017 brought together 176 attendees from across the Asia-Pacific region including AAJA-Asia’s own Brolley Genster, Elaine Ramirez and Mike Raomanachai for three days of intensive workshopping on innovations in digital journalism tools and how to use technology to distinguish fact from fiction.

For 2017, Google is focusing on using its tools and partnerships for journalists under four categories: trust and verification, data journalism, 360 video and inclusive storytelling.

Google gave us a crash course on APAC’s ever-changing digital journalism industry.

Here are the products Google wants journalists to know about:

  • First Draft, Propublica’s Electionland and Duke Reporters Lab help reporters build trust and verify facts.
  • Documenting Hate, Electionland and Crosscheck are great sources to create data journalism without too much tech.
  • Google Trends Datastore is a massive data curation database.
  • Flourish, built by Kiln, helps build easy and beautiful data visualizations.
  • Journalism 360, set up by Google News Lab, Knight Foundation and the Online News Association, is a program to help accelerate the understanding and production of immersive journalism. You can subscribe to updates at bit.ly/Journalism360.
  • Reveal Labs, Ida B Wells Society and Witness Media Lab provide tools to use tech to represent the underrepresented.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. Google encourages newsrooms to hold their own training courses and provides plenty of tools at the Google News Lab.

Innovations in APAC

Aida Aguilar from Google highlighted innovations in APAC that are impacting how newsrooms reach communities.

News’ social roles can be divided into three key categories: civic duty (journalism’s watchdog role), interests (giving readers info about their interests) and aspirations (helping readers accomplish their goals).

Media companies can’t just focus on “viewers” or “readers” anymore — news is now a multi-platform experience. Based on readership data analysis in partnership with Kantar TNS, these are the five things news consumers want us journalists to know:

  1. They want help to “keep up” — readers want news to spell out the most important things to stay aware of.
  2. They read news online for speed and ease — in the smartphone era, readers expect their news in timely, digestible tidbits.
  3. They consume news on every platform — the average news consumer uses 4-6 platforms a day, and news has to fit on every single one.
  4. They prefer different formats for breakfast, lunch and dinner — news consumers prefer reading articles in the morning when their mind is fresh, social media at lunch to discuss the news, and videos in the evening when they want to unwind.
  5. For breaking news, videos are the preferred medium.

The future of news media

What can KakaoTalk tell you about the future of news? That’s what the Institute of the Future (IFTF) is trying to crack.

Andrew Trabulsi and Rebecca Chesney believe that Asia’s full-service chat apps such as WeChat, KakaoTalk and LINE are transforming the way information is shared and represent a growing proportion of information and news consumption. They are writing a white paper on their case study of South Korea’s KakaoTalk, which will be published in the next few months.

Why KakaoTalk? In Korea, KakaoTalk is a way of life. It’s installed on 99 percent of smart devices and used by virtually every age group. Koreans prefer sharing content on KakaoTalk rather than social channels like Facebook or Twitter because it’s more private and people are concerned about their reputation. People can use it not only to send messages and cute emoticon stickers, but also read news, play games and send payments to friends. That makes the app a great barometer to gauge how all of South Korea is consuming news in the digital age.

There’s plenty for global newsrooms to parse from these trends. Here’s a sneak peak of their findings:

Korean journalists use KakaoTalk as a newsroom. Editors use chat apps to give assignments, allowing reporters to stay in the field longer. Government spokespeople use them as a virtual pressroom, ensuring accountability. Chat apps also bring journalists closer to sources through open chat rooms.

Koreans consume news in chatrooms. Users tend to consume news through trending features, and people are telling visual stories through graphics and card news. However, it doesn’t seem like Korean media outlets have caught up to the trend — they are not yet driving the conversation on chat apps effectively, the researchers found.

Newsrooms see chat apps as a channel out, but not a two-way engagement. Newsrooms still need to figure out how to adapt hard news stories to the evolving consumption patterns.

People are willing to pay. That’s evidenced by KakaoTalk’s multimillion-dollar sticker market. But while they’re willing to buy insane emoticons, they won’t pay for mediocre news.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. The Southeast Asia and Seoul subchapters are planning follow-up events to share the Google knowhow with AAJA-Asia members. Stay tuned on your local Facebook groups for details.

Why attend AAJA’s National Convention? Here are 6 reasons

Why attend AAJA’s National Convention? Here are 6 reasons

 

by AAJA-Asia 2017 national convention goers

 

AAJA’s national convention “Rise & Revolutionize”, which took place between July 26 through 29 in Philadelphia, attracted around 850 attendees. The conference had something for everyone. It offered a full schedule with various programming tracks during the day and back-to-back networking events after hours for AAJA members.

 

The gala banquet keynote speakers were Eddie Huang, celebrity chef and author of Fresh Off the Boat, and Rich Cho, general manager of the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets.

 

Next year’s AAJA national convention will be in Houston in August 2018. Seven Asia members, who attended the Philadelphia conference, tell us why Asia chapter members should consider planning for next year’s convention.

 

  1. Connect and reconnect

Attending an AAJA convention is like “coming home”, says AAJA-Asia president Angie Lau (anchor for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong). She calls the convention a “giant family reunion” because AAJA members are your network “from getting advice to sharing advice.”

The national convention is an opportunity to “connect or reconnect”, says former Asia chapter president Ken Moritsugu (news director for Japan and the Koreas for AP). He says the convention puts him in touch “with other journalists, with American news media trends, with Asian American issues.”

 

  1. Find your support network

“You are only as strong as your support system and AAJA [unites] all of us,” says India-based Archith Seshadri (anchor for Wion News in New Delhi). He’s made it to 10 AAJA conventions so far.

 

Beijing-based Wendy Tang (freelance tech reporter) says networking at the conventions have helped her find her professional support base. “We meet once a year at the convention to catch up, discuss the industry and find new job opportunities,” she said.

 

  1. Sharpen your journalism skills

The national convention is a place to sharpen your professional skills. The convention is the “J-school I never went to,” says Seshadri.

 

Tokyo-based Jake Adelstein (investigative journalist) finds AAJA workshops helpful to his job. “This year the [Investigative Reporters and Editors] workshop on data on deadline was enormously useful in learning to better make use of Excel, to analyze data [and] make pivot tables,” he said.

 

  1. Be inspired, be energized

Moritsugu says he has learned from and has felt inspired by the experiences of others he’s met at conventions. “I always leave the convention smarter and re-energized about journalism and AAJA,” he said.

 

“My AAJA connections and the work of other [Asian American and Pacific Islander] journalists have continued to be an inspiration,” said Tang.

 

  1. Hang out. Enjoy!

The national convention is the only time of the year you get to see most AAJA members outside of your chapter and “you end up skipping regular convention programming because time flies when you’re catching up,” says Tokyo-based Yuri Nagano (senior reporter for Acuris/Mergermarket Group in Tokyo).

The karaoke night at the end of the convention “is always a wonderful way” to spend time “with my favorite AAJAers”, says Adelstein.

 

  1. Explore an unfamiliar city

Travelling to national conventions may mean learning about a new city for many of us.

 

“I love it when the AAJA national convention takes place in a city I’ve never visited before,” says HK-based Oanh Ha (Asia consumer and health news team leader, Bloomberg News) “It’s a great chance to meet local journalists from the city, understand the issues in that community and explore a part of the U.S. I’m not familiar with,” she said.

 

This year it was interesting to walk the historical sights of Philadelphia, where both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution were signed, said Nagano.

 

The 2018 national convention will take place at the Marriot Marquis Houston from August 8-11.

 

Join AAJA here. http://www.aaja.org/join

 

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Get involved: Join N3Con’s 2018 team now!

If you went to N3Con 2017 in Hong Kong last month, you probably left feeling educated, energized and with a lot of new friends in the media industry. It takes a lot of work to pull off a conference like that, and we want next year’s to be even better.

 

 

The N3Con planning team is getting started early to set the stage for N3Con 2018 in Hong Kong and invites you to be part of the process. Volunteer to help plan the panels and events, fine-tune the website, have fun with social media marketing, edit the magazine, help on-site and more. Then watch it all pay off when hundreds of journalists across the continent at Asia’s most influential media conference.

 

Sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/EePqOTrVCajvw3Hq1

 

For questions, email aajaasia@gmail.com.

 

See you in Hong Kong!

**Calling all veteran journalists! Submit your story for our Lightning Talks**

A call out to veteran journalists!

Have you ever made a mistake that was so horrific that you felt like crawling into your bed and wished you never had to come out?

What is the worst mistake you made as a journalist in Asia that you would not want to see repeated by another AAJA-Asia member?

Mistakes can involve attire, protocols for interviews/press conferences, having the wrong plug adapter, whatever.

Submit your story here.


Check out a story of one of our dear AAJA members–

When I was a student reporter just starting out in broadcast, I had not quite handled the art of juggling yet.  You see, as a broadcaster, there are a lot of things going on.  To the audience, you’re just talking to them.  But behind the scenes, we have producers talking in our ear telling us about the next commercial break or if video or sound bite we expected to introduce next was suddenly unavailable… you get the idea.
So, there I was, proudly in the broadcast booth, reporting on a story.  I tried in my most authoritative broadcast voice to intone: “Hundreds of workers at the local auto plant got laid…. ” (pregnant pause, as a producer, was talking in my ear to tell me something urgent, and I instinctively stopped to listen.  When I processed, I resumed my broadcast) “… off today.”
Too late.  The disaster of the unfortunately timed pregnant pause.  Sadly for the workers, it was indeed a layoff and they lost their jobs.  But it sounded a lot more optimistic with my pregnant pause 🙂
Got a helpful tip to share?

If you do, buzz out to us! 

[https://www.n3con.com/lighting-talks-at-n3con-2017/]

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 29 April 2017

AAJA_Mistake

**N3con(New,Now,Next!) early bird rates are out! **

Greetings from AAJA-Asia

 

Here are the list of announcements made on the newsletter!

 

 

N3Con 2017

DATES: May 19-21, 2017 in Hong Kong

THEME: Social Disruption: Navigating the New Journalism

WEBSITE: n3con.com

As news becomes the news, early bookings indicate an excellent turnout this year.

A. Lightning Talk : Learn From My Mistakes

This year, we invite our members to share lessons learned by submitting a mistake for our Lightning Talk. This quick series of talks is aimed at providing practical tips to conference participants. Successful submissions will be presented at the conference, whether or not you will be attending.

  • Click here for more information about the Lightning Talks.
  • Application deadline: Saturday, April 15 at 10pm Hong Kong time

B. N3 Travel Stipend and Complimentary Registration

Once again, AAJA-Asia is supporting active members to attend N3Con by granting 2 travel stipends to defray travel and accommodation costs. Successful applicants will also receive complimentary tickets to attend the conference.

  • Click here for more information about the Travel Stipend.
  • Application deadline: Sunday, April 30 at 10pm Hong Kong time

C. Save $$$ on your ticket price — book now

In order to qualify for the member rate, you will be asked for your private, non-transferrable, member ID during the registration process. If you have not received your Member ID, submit your request by reply to this email.

Register by April 15 for the best price.

  • US$75 members | US$100 guests : Advance Booking (until April 15)
  • US$100 members | US$150 guests : Regular Price (until April 30)
  • US$150 members | US$200 guests : Late Booking (from May 1)

**AAJA ASIA election results are out**

Dear members,
Thank you very much for your participation in the AAJA-Asia Election 2016-17. The results are in! Please join me in congratulating the following winners:
All terms start on 1 January, 2017 and last for 2 years. 
President: Angie Lau
Treasurer: Eunice Kim
Singapore VP: Chelsea Phua
Tokyo Co-VPs: Haruka Nuga & Hiromi Tanoue
At-large board members: Zela Chin & Eunji Kim
National board representative: Yuriko Nagano

 

All other officers will remain their terms until the end of 2017. 

 

we want YOU for AAJA-Asia Election 2016!

Dear members,

 

ONE MORE WEEK TO GO BEFORE SUBMISSION OF CANDIDACY LETTERS CLOSES. 

It’s election season again! Now is the time for you to step up and help lead our 200-strong chapter into an amazing 2017. We have these positions coming open, which will begin January 1, 2017 and last for a term of two years:

 

President, AAJA-Asia

The president, in conjunction with the rest of the board, sets direction for the chapter, chairs chapter board meetings and is the public face of the chapter.

 

Treasurer 

The treasurer keeps the financial records of the chapter, submits financial reports required by the AAJA National Office and helps set direction for the chapter.

 

Vice President, Tokyo 

Vice President, Singapore

Regional vice presidents are the point persons for AAJA in their respective cities. They answer questions about AAJA and plan and coordinate local events and oversee membership recruitment in their city. They also work with the president and other officers to set overall direction for the chapter. One may be designated to assume the responsibilities of the president in his or her absence

National Board Representative

These two positions are the chapter’s representative platforms to the national advisory board, similar to U.S. senators to Congress. AAJA-Asia must be represented in person at the two advisory board meetings held every year in the United States. One of the meetings occurs at the national convention. The board representatives will keep the Asia chapter board apprised of national policies and procedures. S/he will write summary report of the national board meetings that will be provided to the Asia board. In light of AAJA-Asia’s new status as a large chapter, defined as having more than 100 full members, we have one additional seat to fill to represent us at National.

ONE At-large Board Member Position

Chapter board members help set direction for the chapter. They also may take charge of specific areas such as fundraising or membership and recruitment. They answer questions from members, work to increase membership and engage in membership outreach

 

Student Representative 

Student representatives help organize activities and promote the organization on campus. They answer questions from teachers and students, work to increase student membership and engage in membership outreach.

 

Key Dates to Run

 

December 9: Candidate Letters

Submit a letter of candidacy to this email by this date. All letters will be posted on the AAJA-Asia chapter website.

December 11-17: Election Week

All AAJA-Asia members will receive an electronic ballot to vote. All votes must be made before midnightThursday December 22. We will report the votes to AAJA National in San Francisco and winning candidates will be notified.

December 20: Announcement of winners

In addition to helping lead professional and social events in your cities and countries, all AAJA board members are required to call in to a monthly virtual board meeting to update chapter leaders on programming, future planning and simply to stay connected with a friendly hello across our vast distances.

 

Questions? E-mail Billy Wong, AAJA-Asia Election Chair at billywsk@connect.hku.hk or Carina Lee at carina.lee713@gmail.com

 

Good luck with your candidacies and we look forward to working with you to take AAJA-Asia forward and upward.

For Southeast Asia members, a trip into Malaysia

When four hungry AAJ-Asia members encountered a delay on the the Singapore-Malaysia border one Saturday morning, they had no inkling that they would soon embark on a two-day eating adventure. Starving one moment, but unable to find space in their stomachs for more food the next.

The trip to Kluang, Malaysia, only a little more than two hours from Singapore, was organized by a local, Vino Wong, a visual journalist who used to work in Atlanta. He had planned a foodie trip of sorts (with a hike thrown in) for Nov. 26-27, for AAJA-Asia members in the region. Three members in Singapore, one based in Bangkok, and a few other friends went. Follow the AAJA-Asia (Singapore) Facebook page to find out about future events or for recommendations! Below are photos from the outing, by Vino Wong, Daylon Soh, and Mike Raomanachai.

 

Weekend Chatter in SG: Exploring future of journalism

Adapt or die – is that what traditional media and newsrooms are facing now? How is journalism and storytelling evolving with new media platforms?

Join our esteemed panel for discussions of staying true to good old-fashioned journalism of shoe leather reporting, while at the same time adapting stories and transforming how they are being told for a digital-age audience.

Date: July 30, 2016
Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm
Venue: BASH, 79 Ayer Rajah Crescent, #03-01. Singapore 139955
RSVP: newmediacontent.eventbrite.com

Our panelists are:

Screen Shot 2016-07-02 at 6.20.52 PM

 

  • Linus Chua Managing Editor of Southeast Asia, Bloomberg.

 Linus Chua is the Southeast Asia Managing Editor overseeing six Bloomberg News bureaus across the region. He was previously the Singapore Bureau Chief and Asia Editor for the Billionaires Team. Since he joined at the peak of the 1997 Asian financial Crisis, he has covered a wide variety of beats and also ran the Emerging Markets Stocks Team in Asia. Prior to Bloomberg News, Linus was a Broadcast Journalist at MediaCorp. in Singapore. He started his career as a Business Reporter for the Palm Beach Post in West Palm Beach, Florida. Linus has a BA in Journalism and Economics from Marquette University in Wisconsin. During that time, he interned at Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Milwaukee Journal and Forbes.

  • Jessica Tan, Journalism Lecturer at Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information, Nanyang Technological University; Contributing Writer, Forbes Asia

Over her journalism career, she has interviewed and profiled people from all walks of life — from billionaire tycoons, celebrities to the man on the street. Some of her most memorable assignments include spending a day with Warren Buffett in Omaha, Nebraska and swimming with whale sharks in Western Australia.

A seasoned journalist with nearly 15 years of industry experience, she has worked at The Straits Times, Channel i News, Dow Jones Newswires and Forbes Asia. She has been contributing to Forbes Asia since 2006.

  • Joon-Nie Lau, Assistant Director, Newsplex Asia, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University

At Nanyang Technological University, Joon-Nie heads Newsplex Asia, a convergent training newsroom and media lab in partnership with the European-headquartered World Association of Newspapers and Publishers (WAN-IFRA). Joon-Nie is also co-founder of Hacks/Hackers Singapore chapter and is a Vice-President of the Singapore Press Club.

A lawyer by training, Joon-Nie has spent over 15 years in broadcast television as a reporter, interactive producer, current affairs producer and news editor at Channel NewsAsia and its predecessors SBC News and TCS News. While on Channel NewsAsia’s International News Desk, Joon-Nie travelled extensively to countries like Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, offering Channel NewsAsia’s viewers new insights into these countries. She has won several in-house awards for reporting, executive producing and best ‘live’ coverage. In 2001, she received a Student Emmy for her Masters documentary project “Blue Sky Station: New York’s Third Chinatown”.

  • Yi Wen Chan, Co-Founder, Bolt

Yi Wen is the co-founder of Bolt Media, a content marketing platform that helps businesses tell great stories to drive brand awareness by matching them to experienced content creators and providing them with tools to effectively collaborate. Bolt has been named as one of the 8 startups to watch in 2016 by The Straits Times. Previously a journalist at The Business Times, a financial daily under Singapore Press Holdings, Yi Wen was recently featured in the inaugural Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia 2016 for Media, Marketing & Advertising.

  • (Moderator) Mike Raomanachai, Reporter and Anchor, Voice TV

Mike Raomanachai is a technology reporter and anchor for Voice TV, a national network in Bangkok, Thailand. He graduated with a Master Degree in Multimedia Communications at Academy of Art University, San Francisco, CA, where he is inspired by technology businesses in Silicon Valley. Mike is also a multimedia journalist who has been working on new reporting platforms such as live streaming and live blogging for the past 3 years.

 

Submit YOUR job postings

AAJA’s Asia chapter is one of the largest within the international association and also has one of the largest networks of English-speaking journalists globally. Chapter members are based around the Asia Pacific region, from Japan to Nepal and range from university students to industry veterans. To submit your job posting to AAJA’s Asia chapter, email aajaasia@gmail.com